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Page 1 of 1Total of 15 messages
Posted by:Mar 25th 2010, 10:32:44 pm
ColinThe Mens Club sounds fabulous. I hope Briland can regain the elegance, gentleness, decency and beauty that embedded it in my heart in the 70s and 80s
Posted by:Mar 24th 2010, 11:05:48 pm
The Fig Tree News TeamJust a reminder about Friday's meeting at the Courthouse March 26th 2010 - 7pm! You are encouraged to come out & join us as we aim to put together a committee that represents the Briland youth!

This first meeting is to establish interested and serious members. We will discuss areas of concerns. In order to make a difference we need to work as a TEAM! So you are encouraged to join!... See More

Young people, this is your chance to have your voice heard!!!

" We are looking for concerned members of our community to come and support for our childrens future; there are many concerns and teenage pregnancies is at the top of our priority.
So if you are interested, and you have the time and some ideas please feel free to voice your thoughts....

We would like aunts, uncles, mothers, fathers, godparents, cousins, winter-residences, hotel mamagers, basically if you reside here you are a part of our community and we would like to hear your opinion!!!
Posted by:Mar 22nd 2010, 07:47:47 pm
BrilandkidBriland will never have sufficient Electrical power because source and load does not have the supporting substations and BEC is and was aware once proper electrical calculation was completed but greed overcame logic.
Posted by:Mar 18th 2010, 07:10:01 pm
The Fig Tree News TeamTHE GENTLEMEN'S CLUB OF HARBOUR ISLAND

A group of concerned men of Dunmore Town, Harbour Island saw it fit to have a meeting to address pressing issues that are affecting the community and indeed the men of our island.

After various meetings and discussions it was decided that this group would be called "The Gentlemen's Club of Harbour Island".

The Gentlemen's Club of Harbour Island would like to address and to see how best resolution can brought to the following issues:-

Immigration: to deal with all illegal immigrants on the island

Traffic: to control the traffic flow on the island
to control incoming vehicles

to remove all derelict vehicles and golfcart

to address the issue the amount of Private Plates
being rented

to control the amount of underage persons driving
without a driver's license or permit

Youth Action: to assist in Big Brother Program for the young men in the community

Beautification: to host a major clean up of the island and beach

Commonage Land: to attend meetings regularly and assist
the committee

Government Dock: to be a liasion with Government and the Administrator to extend the dock which is badly needed

Power Plant: to find ways of providing power to Harbour
Island with out having to deal with the numerous power outages

-- all from a flyer giving to us by Mr. Martin Grant and club members.
Posted by:Mar 17th 2010, 09:39:13 am
KifWhat a terrific idea! Since I'm in Utah and cannot attend this time, please present the importance of education coupled with parental support of the same on my behalf.

I recently read Greg Mortenson's second book, "Stones into Schools" in which he further elaborates on his work building schools in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

He missed out on a lot of his own children's growing experiences, but was home when his son read his first words:

"When you are a parent, the instant your child first begins to read is a moment of the purest magic. It doesn't matter whether you happen to live in Kashmir or Montana or Tanzania or Manhattan ― witnessing the fire of literacy ignite in the mind of a child is something transcendent. To me, it felt exactly like releasing the string on a helium-filled balloon and watching it ascend into the sky all by itself."

After 30 years of war,

"The Afghans want their children to go to school because literacy represents what neither we (the US) nor anyone else has so far managed to offer them: hope, progress, and the possibility of controlling their own destiny."

Greg has chosen to build schools in "the last best places" for people in the very most remote areas of their countries. In September 2009, a school for the Kirghiz people, with Greg's foundation's assistance, finished building their own first school. It is located in the Wakhan Valley, the westernmost finger of Afghanistan; sandwiched between the High Pamir and Hindu Kush mountain ranges; and closed to all outside traffic from October until spring because of snow and avalanches. In establishing solid, open relationships with the Elders of the Kirghiz people, Greg learned,

"...what the Kirghiz needed was something infinitely more precious and indispensable than whatever assistance might have been rendered by me, the American military, or anyone else who was not part of their community. In place of our help, what they needed most was the sense of empowerment that comes from knowing that they had done it (built the school at Bozai Gumbaz) on their own."

This accomplishment is particularly significant in light of the fact a large number of the isolated Kirghiz had become addicted to heroin as a result of the proximity to the opium trade routes and the feeling of helplessness. Now, they have built hope for their own future and that of their descendants.

As for myself, I thank the children and parents of Briland who have given me some of my richest experiences and memories through sharing in the learning experiences of the young and older.

Be it drugs, alcohol, or early pregnancy, children and adults first need an overriding reason NOT to succumb. Literacy is without doubt a huge step toward the freedom of choice, of empowering all toward a life of fulfillment realizing one's own greatest potential.

(About the author: Greg had a failed attempt on K2, the second highest mountain in the world. He became lost and was taken in by Pakistani villagers in a remote area. He promised to build a school for them one day. His first book, "Three Cups of Tea" is about doing just that; not one school, but hundreds in Pakistan and now the second book is about the hundreds he is building in Afghanistan.)
Posted by:Mar 16th 2010, 02:49:44 pm
The Fig Tree News TeamBrilanders: Harbour Islanders For Change sends along the following community announcement:

ON MARCH 23rd, NEXT TUESDAY AT 6PM IN THE COURTROOM, THERE IS GOING TO BE A MEETING --- OUR FOCUS IS OUR CHILDREN, AND THE GRAVE CONCERN ABOUT THE TEENAGE PREGNANCY AND MORE[ISSUES IN FAMILIES, KIDS UNATTENDED ROAMING THE STREETS ETC.]

THIS IS NOT ONLY FOR THE WOMEN- WE WOULD LIKE THE FATHERS TO COME OUT AS WELL!!!
TEENAGE PREGNANCY DOES NOT JUST CONCERN YOUNG FEMALES BUT THE MALES AS WELL!!!

WE WOULD LIKE THIS TO BE A FAMILY ORIENTATED GROUP, SO IF YOU ARE AN AUNTY OR UNCLE, MOTHER, FATHER, SISTER, BROTHER, COUSIN, GODFATHER, GODMOTHER, ALSO HOTEL MANAGERS, PASTORS, HOMEOWNERS AND ARE CONCERNED PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COME OUT AND SUPPORT!!!

WE HAVE NO EXACT NAME FOR IT AS YET, BUT WE HAVE THE ISSUES AT HAND AND NEED TO DO SOMETHING...
LET'S ALL COME OUT AND SHOW SUPPORT AND GO FROM THERE....

PLEASE SPREAD THE WORD, WE WILL MAKE UP FLYERS AND POST THEM SO THAT IT WILL BE SHOWN AROUND TOWN.

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE FEEL FREE TO TALK TO EITHER MS. SHETA DAVIS, MR. ASHLEY PERCENTIE AND OR MYSELF...

MANY THANKS AND WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO A GREAT TURN OUT....
"OUR CHILDREN ARE OUR FUTURE..."
Posted by:Mar 10th 2010, 07:56:54 pm
Fig Tree News TeamWhen Arthur Curry ran the Harbour Island Power Company, it was a privately-run company, as is the Spanish Wells Power Company to this day. Since 1979, when that plant burned down, we have had the BEC government presence on Bay Street, which has browned out regularly and cost the island hundreds of thousands of dollars (if not million$) over the years in replacement air conditioners, microwaves, television sets and coffeemakers.

If enough Brilanders were to write and call their representatives, their radio stations and newspapers to discuss the situation, got active with local government, volunteered for local committees and attended the regularly-scheduled town hall meetings to air their complaints AND offer constructive suggestions for change ... who knows what might be accomplished?

Go for it, Ash!
Posted by:Mar 10th 2010, 07:34:49 pm
ash12i feel gail and austin,s pain. just how many people we have on the island who,s over eighty years old? having said that,we as residents on the island we continue to pay for utilities but should we just accept the treatment like such? the complaining and finger pointing has to be aimed at someone including our local government! reflecting back at the meeting alot of residents noticed the inattendence from councilors! if they were there, they were hiding at the back of the room nearly outside. i mean they should,ve been the persons there at the front! DARREL JOHNSON clearly is the only person who,s on the council who cares for this island(except maybe two others)should we petition and let the local government be our voice? or simply do it ourselves! eighty years is a longtime many of us really cant remember not having the basic utilities. some say when Mr AUTHUR ran the local power station. it was better. but did we have all of the marinas back then? or all of the residential houses?
Posted by:Mar 9th 2010, 08:50:12 pm
Fig Tree News TeamHere we go again, playing dodge ball, blaming everyone but ourselves for our own island's complete disarray:

For examples of events closer to home, no fewer than 22 farm animals were stolen this week from Gail Davis and Austin Mullin's commonage property holding. Can we please STOP the thieving, whether local or expat or sea urchin or otherwise?

"Honesty is essential within such a small community, if the community is to survive." -- Lord Dunmore Grouper, traveling editor

So, we don't have steady electricity, we don't have decent drinking water, we can't leave our doors open anymore and we're at each other's throats. Fewer than eighty years ago, the island had no power and city water, but people at least got along with each other because their word was their bond and they could trust each other.

Where do we go from here?
Posted by:Mar 5th 2010, 04:52:43 pm
Half A LaughThe high $5000 Annual beach membership, Hotels and Restaurant high rates isn't priced by the Natives. All are own to Investor's, do they LOVE Harbour Island or is it just an investment for them.
Posted by:Mar 5th 2010, 01:29:51 pm
ColinBriland is a classic example of inflation -- too much money chasing too small a place. In many ways I think the increasing accessibility of the island has left it increasingly vulnerable to a basic problem the Bahamas have faced since the US Civil War, a rollicking boom and bust cycle.

From what I read and hear and see, Brilanders with money go to Nassau or the States for education, leaving the less fortunate to grapple with a school system that is very vulnerable to leadership lapses and to its sometime dependence on foreign staff.
The influx of people who saw great opportunities in the wake of Hurricane Andrew -- most of whom had never been to Briland before --helped distort the real estate market. And Brilanders saw huge quantities of cash swirling around that they weren't getting much of. All in all, a socially destabilizing environment. We are seeing the consequences in increased crime rates and the overtaxed infrastructure. Things certainly aren't anything like Jamaica or Trinidad but there are worrying similarities.

Posted by:Mar 5th 2010, 09:25:33 am
Lutra AnnieI first came to the island in 1960 and fell in love with this magical, laid back,charming way of life. I raised my 3 daughters in this relaxed atmosphere and they loved it. But with the very poor electrical supply, water you cannot drink and constant crime problem which is never solved, the magic is gone and so sorry to admit that I cannot wait to sell and find another paradise waiting out there for all us lovers of island living. sharon king
Posted by:Mar 5th 2010, 08:53:32 am
ash12as it relates to the crime (break-ins) i spoke to the police here on the island.what is so common among many visitors and natives, the island that was once so relaxing and laid back is at this time NOMORE. times have changed dramatically. i think personally from an education point of view among the many youngsters we have on the island. the ratio of who is learning and who,s not is a big factor of whats happening now a days. work ethics, soild home training from parents, and most of all, teachers that care! is reason in my view for what is happening on this island also.Natives may agree, on the other hand many may not. but that is what i see. we as natives and the visitors need to secure they,re personal items at all times. lock all doors and windows at all times. it sounds strange for briland i know. but this is what it has come to now. we have alot of people that know info of plenty crime but until the residents learn how to come farward and report what they know, the deterioration will surely continue
Posted by:Mar 5th 2010, 08:45:08 am
MaddieHaving a long legacy on Harbour Island of 45 years, I would sadly tend to agree with these comments.

I too hope they are not true and I will be curious to see what I find when I return in a few weeks after a two year absence.
Posted by:Mar 4th 2010, 11:34:14 am
Fig Tree News TeamWe've noticed sea changes on Harbour Island over the past several years, many for the good ... and a few that may not be in our long-term best interests.

We'd like to jumnpstart the community conversation with a note from former Briland investor Richard Haskell, who owned Dunmore Cottage on Bay Street for a decade. Your thoughts, impressions, concerns are much appreciated.

"I've just returned from a good trip to the island and have been thinking hard about how my thoughts about that special place are changing. I'm beginning to reluctantly agree with the long-voiced opinions of a friend (who has even more of a history with the place than I do). She believes that what's happening on Harbour Island now is the result of dynamic changes on the island (and particular to it) MORE than just the negative effect of the American recession.

That belief which I am beginning to succumb to is that the monetary value of the "Harbour Island experience" as a factor of what people are willing to pay for it---is beginning to vastly EXCEED what a person paying for the "experience" is getting in return. And that this, more than the economy, is what accounts for the general drop-off in what used to be a steady and hearty tourist business there:
Have the cottage rental and hotel prices outstripped peoples' willingness to also endure daily and sometimes lengthy power outages? If someone is paying $5000/week (or $45/ hour for the 16 daylight hours) how much enduring tolerance do they have for the daily / hourly power outages?
Same for water shortages?
Same for crime / break-ins?
Have island prices reached higher than tourists' willingness to lock themselves in at night with all windows closed, and / or having to worry about locking up to run out for 5 minutes to the grocery for a forgotten item?
Same for restaurant prices relative to actual value?
Is the amazing number of properties for sale as much (or more) an indication of owners "giving up" as it is a reflection of the current economy?
Does the $5000 annual hotel beach membership (!) for the cottages cost more than it returns? (Of course it does)

I hope I'm wrong and that with the end of the recession, all will return to well on the island. But I believe it is positive and constructive for the legions of us who love Harbour Island (and who will NEVER get it out of our blood!) to keep flying the red flags of caution until all does return to "well."

-- Richard

Richard H. B. Haskell
Richmond, VA

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