The Briland Modem
Online News & Information for North Eleuthera and Harbour Island, Bahamas
(It's much better in the Out Islands.)

Briland News Link (click)

 
NEWSWORTHY

 

roots

briland

marketplace

 

 

gallery

Exceptional Educational Outreach (Bahamas)

got questions?

 

"Briland sweet, eh?"

Coconut Notes
Review the earliest days of the Board [1999-2002]

Click the Ocean Button to sign in and post to the board.

A one-time registration is required, and your new ID will be automatically recognized the next time that you login.

Click Here to Post a New Topic
To Respond to a Posted Message,
Click the Message

One for good behavior? Introducing Hurricane Epsilon
Click here to return to the subject menu.Click here to search the forum.
Page 1 of 1Total of 2 messages
Posted by:Dec 2nd 2005, 11:56:25 am
Fig Tree News Teamhttp://www.jonesbahamas.com

2nd December
Citrus Insect Management After Hurricanes
Godfrey Eneas

Citrus trees that survived hurricane damage may have lost significant amounts of foliage. After defoliation, surviving trees may experience a strong flush as they start their own healing process. This is very important because new foliage will provide nutrients needed for winter survival and faster tree recovery. Commercial citrus producers must implement practices that protect recovering trees from additional leaf loss caused by foliage- feeding insect pests.

As trees produce new flush growth, citrus leafminers may become a severe problem. Normally, citrus leafminers would be a concern only in young trees, but older trees that lose significant amount of foliage must be protected from losing the much-needed new flush as well.

The best choice for controlling citrus leafminers on commercial orchards is Spintor 2SC at 6 to 8 fl. oz/acre. Agrimek 0.15EC also is a good alternative when applied at 5 to 10 fl. oz/acre. Apply Agrimek only if it was not used earlier for rust mite control to avoid insecticide resistance development in rust mites to this product. Another alternative for citrus leafminer control is Provado. All work best on citrus leafminer when combined with oils (about 5 gal. oil per acre). Seek the advice of your local specialist on the use of oils as we get closer to cooler months. Depending on the condition of your orchard, your citrus specialist may better describe any possible effects on cold hardiness or on next year’s bloom. Admire as a soil application may provide a longer term protection against citrus leafminers applied at 32 fl. oz/acre. You may use Admire at 1/16 oz per small tree and 1/8 oz per large tree in 10 oz of water applied to the soil. Admire is expensive, but it may be justified on younger orchards and producers can follow up with another Admire soil drench application next spring.

Homeowners who have a few citrus trees in the backyard also may obtain excellent control of citrus leafminers by using spinosad formulated for citrus in home gardens. Homeowners may obtain spinosad at local garden centers under different commercial names such as Conserve, Naturalyte Insect Control, Green Light Spinosad, Success, Fertilome Borer, Bagworm, Leafminer & Tent Caterpillar Spray, etc. Citrus leafminer control is important on young, growing backyard citrus trees and mature trees if they have been severely defoliated by hurricane winds. Citrus leafminer control on backyard trees in turn will reduce sources of citrus leafminer infestations, which later migrate to trees in nearby commercial orchards.

Maximum protection for citrus leafminer on both commercial and home garden trees is obtained if sprays are applied when the new foliage is only half emerged and the first affected leaves are just beginning to curl. Remember that protecting trees from additional foliage loss is important because trees use this new growth to accumulate needed carbohydrates to help expedite the healing and recovery process. Apply these citrus leafminer management plans in combination with a complete fertilization, disease and weed management program to revitalize your weaken and stressed trees from hurricane damage.

Before you buy or use an insecticide product, first read the label and strictly follow label recommendations. Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute endorsement by Louisiana State University AgCenter.

Posted by:Dec 2nd 2005, 11:24:47 am
Fig Tree News TeamHURRICANE EPSILON ADVISORY NUMBER 13
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
11 AM AST FRI DEC 02 2005

...EPSILON BECOMES YET ANOTHER HURRICANE IN THE RECORD BREAKING
2005 ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON...

AT 11 AM AST...1500Z...THE CENTER OF HURRICANE EPSILON WAS LOCATED
NEAR LATITUDE 33.7 NORTH... LONGITUDE 48.2 WEST OR ABOUT 1220
MILES...1965 KM... WEST OF THE AZORES.

EPSILON IS MOVING TOWARD THE NORTHEAST NEAR 14 MPH...22 KM/HR...AND
THIS GENERAL MOTION IS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE FOR THE NEXT 24 HOURS.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 75 MPH...120 KM/HR...WITH HIGHER
GUSTS. LITTLE CHANGE IN STRENGTH IS EXPECTED TODAY... BUT GRADUAL
WEAKENING IS FORECAST TO BEGIN LATER TONIGHT OR ON SATURDAY.

HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 15 MILES... 28 KM...
FROM THE CENTER...AND TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP
TO 115 MILES...185 KM.

THE ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 987 MB...29.15 INCHES.

REPEATING THE 11 AM AST POSITION...33.7 N... 48.2 W. MOVEMENT
TOWARD...NORTHEAST NEAR 14 MPH. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED
WINDS... 75 MPH. MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE... 987 MB.

THE NEXT ADVISORY WILL BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER
AT 5 PM AST.

FORECASTER STEWART

Contact us online at
info@briland.com

administration