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Aftermath of Irene
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Page 1 of 1Total of 16 messages
Posted by:Sep 19th 2011, 02:17:38 pm
Fig Tree News TeamArthurs Bakery Blog
http://myharbourisland.com/Irene/content/index_4.html
Posted by:Sep 7th 2011, 04:42:10 pm
Fig Tree News TeamAs it relates to duty exemptions for Harbour Island post-Hurricane Irene, persons who have suffered damage or losses as a result of Hurricane Irene are advised to make their losses known to NEMA as soon as possible so that a decision may be taken with regard to any duty exemption or waiver assistance. Application Forms for Customs’ Duty waivers on imports connected to the repair of damages resulting from Hurricane Irene will be available at the Administrators office. Call Tremane Johnson at 333 3163 for more information.
Posted by:Sep 2nd 2011, 05:08:51 pm
Fig Tree News TeamHundreds without water, electricity, phone services in North Eleuthera

http://www.tribune242.com/news/09022011_North-Eleuthera_news_pg1

By SANCHESKA BROWN

HUNDREDS of North Eleuthera residents are still without water, electricity and phone services, one week after Hurricane Irene devastated the island.

In addition to having no water with which to cook or bathe, no lights and no communication, residents have also now found themselves with no diesel.

The shortage of diesel has crippled the community and has also shut down operations at the North Eleuthera airport.

International flights at the airport have ceased as there is no more diesel to operate the generators. There is no way for the pilots to communicate with the UNICOM system to clear for landing and the lights on the runway are not functioning.

During a tour of the North Eleuthera airport Thursday, the PLP's candidate Clay Sweeting said he offered to ship the diesel to the airport from Spanish Wells, but it was refused.

"They told me they are getting the diesel from New Providence. I don't know why they would do that. It's cheaper if they get it locally. They won't have to pay shipping fees and all that but they told me no. It's more expensive and it'll take longer to get it from New Providence."

PLP Leader Perry Christie said it is a shame that the airport is not functioning because there is no diesel, especially in a place that attracts tourists.

"It's just appalling coming into an international airport like North Eleuthera Airport and learning there is no diesel and they are being held back by orders to only get diesel from New Providence as opposed to purchasing it in Spanish Wells" he said. "This is an area that has a lot of international residents who live in Harbour Island and rely on this airport."

Lack of running water is also a major problem. Water and Sewerage Manager Gregory Johnson said the corporation is doing all it can to restore water to North Eleuthera.

"Our generators have failed and our backup generators stopped working on Wednesday. They are old and they need to be replaced. There is little we can do until the power comes back on. The generators that ran the well fields aren't working so we are in the process of trying to get water from the naval base in South Eleuthera, but that too will only last for so long. So right now Harbour Island and North Eleuthera are without water."

Bahamas Electricity Corporation officials said they have restored power to most of the island.

However, most of North Eleuthera, particularly Cupids Cay and James Cistern, are still without power.

One BEC worker, who wishes to remain anonymous, said the reason it is taking so long to restore power is because there are only 12 BEC workers for the entire island.

"There is only a handful of us to do this entire island. We need help. No one has come to help us from Nassau yet. We started in the south and we are working our way down, but so many poles are destroyed it's gonna take forever for us to finish. We need more hands. We just cannot do this alone."

In a press release from BEC, the company said: "In the islands where the damage was more extensive, Cat Island and Eleuthera, the Corporation has enlisted the assistance of Carilec (an association of electric utilities, suppliers, manufacturers and other stakeholders operating in the electricity industry in the Caribbean). Three teams are expected to be in the country by Sunday, September 41. Two of the teams will be deployed to Cat Island and a third team to Eleuthera where they will assist with the restoration effort."

Gregory Collie, a resident, said with all the damage in Eleuthera, he finds it appalling that the Prime Minister would say the island was not badly damaged.

"How could he say that. We have no power, no water, no communication. Most people have tarps on their roofs because of the damage. People have to replace furniture because the water was at least six feet high."

Mr Christie and Mr Sweeting were joined by PLP Deputy Leader "Brave" Davis and party chairman Bradley Roberts. They distributed bags of ice throughout North Eleuthera to those without power.

South Eleuthera was not badly damaged.

The team heads for Cat Island, today.

Published On:Friday, September 02, 2011
Posted by:Sep 2nd 2011, 12:21:45 pm
Fig Tree News TeamSpecific to Eleuthera and Harbour Island's interests, per the recent announcement, please note:

"Persons resident on islands not listed in the Exigency Order but who have suffered damage or losses as a result of Hurricane Irene are advised to make their losses known to NEMA as soon as possible so that a decision may be taken with regard to any assistance or remedy which may be applied to their cases. Application Forms for Customs’ Duty waivers on imports connected to the repair of damages resulting from Hurricane Irene are available at the NEMA office in New Providence and at the offices of all Family Island Administrators.

Members of the public are also reminded that under the provisions of the Family Island Development Encouragement Act 2008, duty free importation of building materials is permitted up to 30th June, 2013 for the construction of new buildings or the rehabilitation, remodelling or extension of existing residential and or commercial buildings. Islands which benefit under the Family Island Development Encouragement Act include Sweeting’s Cay and Water Cay, Grand Bahama; Grand Cay and Moores Island, Abaco; Current Island, Eleuthera; Andros; Cat Island; San Salvador; Rum Cay; Long Island; Crooked Island; Long Cay; Acklins; Ragged Island and Cays; Mayaguana and Inagua.

The public is also advised that where materials and replacement goods are purchased in The Bahamas the affected individual may apply for Customs’ Duty refund. Such claims must be submitted to NEMA and each claim certified by the appropriate Family Island Administrator or the designated official at NEMA."
Posted by:Sep 2nd 2011, 12:20:50 pm
Fig Tree News TeamMinistry of Finance
Press Statement
31 August 2011

Minister of Finance Signs Exigency Orders

Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, the Rt. Hon. Hubert Ingraham on Tuesday August 30, 2011 signed an Exigency Order allowing for duty exemptions for the urgent need for goods necessary for the relief of residents and the agricultural and fisheries industries in various islands suffering hardship as a result of Hurricane Irene.

The Order provides for the waiver of duties on the importation of building materials, electrical and plumbing fixtures and materials, household furniture, furnishing and appliances as required for the relief of residents in the Islands listed in Schedules of the Order: Long Cay, Mayaguana, Rum Cay, San Salvador, Inagua, Ragged Island, Acklins and Crooked Island. The duty waivers are in effect for 6 months for Cat Island and Acklins the hardest hit islands. For the other islands listed above the exemption is for 3 months.

The Order provides for duty exemptions for the replacement of vehicles, cycles or carts destroyed by the hurricane and for the replacement of destroyed and damaged agricultural supplies and fisheries equipment.

All requests for duty waiver on goods will require the certification of the Local Government Administrator that the goods are for the relief of victims of the hurricane and verification that replacement goods are for items destroyed by the hurricane. Where relief and replacement items relate to either the agricultural or fisheries sector, these will require the certification of the Director of Fisheries or the Director of Agriculture.

Persons resident on islands not listed in the Exigency Order but who have suffered damage or losses as a result of Hurricane Irene are advised to make their losses known to NEMA as soon as possible so that a decision may be taken with regard to any assistance or remedy which may be applied to their cases. Application Forms for Customs’ Duty waivers on imports connected to the repair of damages resulting from Hurricane Irene are available at the NEMA office in New Providence and at the offices of all Family Island Administrators.

Members of the public are also reminded that under the provisions of the Family Island Development Encouragement Act 2008, duty free importation of building materials is permitted up to 30th June, 2013 for the construction of new buildings or the rehabilitation, remodelling or extension of existing residential and or commercial buildings. Islands which benefit under the Family Island Development Encouragement Act include Sweeting’s Cay and Water Cay, Grand Bahama; Grand Cay and Moores Island, Abaco; Current Island, Eleuthera; Andros; Cat Island; San Salvador; Rum Cay; Long Island; Crooked Island; Long Cay; Acklins; Ragged Island and Cays; Mayaguana and Inagua.

The public is also advised that where materials and replacement goods are purchased in The Bahamas the affected individual may apply for Customs’ Duty refund. Such claims must be submitted to NEMA and each claim certified by the appropriate Family Island Administrator or the designated official at NEMA.

Below are schedules referenced in the Exigency Order dated 30 August, 2011:

SCHEDULE A

DUTY FREE GOODS

Part A

Building materials
Electrical fixtures and materials
Plumbing fixtures and materials
Household furniture, furnishing and appliances


Part B (Farming Industry)

Supplies for the reconstruction and repair to greenhouses, including plant sleeves, timers, plant pots and soil-less growth.
Supplies for the reconstruction and repair to poultry houses.
Supplies for the reconstruction and repair of irrigation systems.
Nursery stock for the re-establishment of fruit orchards.
Items required for fencing.

Part C (Fishing Industry)

Galvanized sheeting and other materials used in the construction of fishing habitats.
Fishing boats
Fishing gear and apparatus

Part D

Motor Vehicles
Motor Cycles
Golf Carts

SCHEDULE B

Islands

Long Cay
Mayaguana
Rum Cay
San Salvador
Inagua
Ragged Island

SCHEDULE C

Cat Island
Acklins

Geneva Cooper
Sr. Director
Visitor Experience

The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism & Aviation
George & King Streets
P.O. Box N-3701 Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 242-302-2008 Fax: 242-302-2098
www.bahamas.com
www.tourismtoday.com
Posted by:Aug 31st 2011, 09:38:19 am
KifThank you, Tess.
Posted by:Aug 30th 2011, 10:44:46 am
HIflyerHappy to report that power and internet came on in the west side of Trianna shores Late yesterday. Major cleanuos under way. Debris being stored at the school??? No propane on the island. Heading back to FL tomorrow
Posted by:Aug 29th 2011, 09:53:56 pm
TessFor those of you still hungry for visuals...I've put about 35 pix taken Friday and Saturday on a Shutterfly "Share Site". Here's the link (hope it works!) http://brilandpostirene.shutterfly.com/
Posted by:Aug 29th 2011, 03:52:39 pm
Fig Tree News TeamNL Johnson writes:

- Love the Bahamas? Plant a tree! Lignum vitae and Sapodilly rarely blow down in a storm. The Royal Poncianna is also a good choice. Even if the storm blows the pears and mangoes off of the tree, you'll have breakfast AND something to sell to keep your pocketbook full after the storm.
Posted by:Aug 29th 2011, 04:09:59 am
Fig Tree News TeamThe Eleutheran - Eleuthera News, Sport and much more from Eleuthera:

Structural Damage in Eleuthera, Following Hurricane Irene

(Eleuthera, Bahamas) - Difficulties in communication have hampered Eleuthera’s
ability to relay the true image of the damage islanders suffered in the wake of
Hurricane Irene. Certainly, Eleuthera was not devastated by Irene, however, it
will be costly for many families here, especially in central Eleuthera.

Many homes suffered minor to medium level damage on their roofs resulting in
loss of ceilings and property while others had large pieces of their roofs torn
off by the winds.

The Cat 3 storm barreled across the island on Wednesday (24th) night and
Thursday (25th) during the day, with powerful winds reaching approximately
115mph sustained. Analysis of the track of the storm shows that North Eleuthera
would have been on the weaker western side of the hurricane while central and
parts of south Eleuthera may have encountered the more dangerous northern
quadrant.

Flooding of the Bayfront in Governor's Harbour went at high as residential
communities and businesses, including Eleuthera Supply which also had its' top
canopy mangled by the strong winds.

After touring the island from Deep Creek in the south to Gene’s Bay and Three
Island Dock in the north, it is fair to say that the most significant damage
occurred in Central Eleuthera from Palmetto Point to James’ Cistern where
poles littered the streets. Significant damage could also, however, be found in
other settlements, including Rock Sound where a number of residences on the
north side lost pieces of their roofs.

Damaged home of Rodwell and Audrey Knowles in Palmetto Point.

In Palmetto Point some homes also had their roofs very badly damaged and many
others suffered loss of shingles and felt. As Audrey Knowles of Palmetto Point
stood just outside of her front door, with a wet mattress sunning next to her,
on Friday, August 26 – one day after Hurricane Irene ravished her home, she
shared her family’s frightening hurricane experience with The Eleutheran. She
described in vivid detail, the terrifying sound of her roof under stress,
threatening to pull away from its’ belt at moments to 5am on Thursday morning.

This is around the same time many Central Eleuthera residents describe the
worst winds of the entire night, surrounding their homes. Her husband Rodwell,
marshalled their family together, which included a young grandbaby, as water
rushed into their bedroom, through a compromised portion of roof. Knowing that
it was no longer safe to stay in the home, the family tried to make its way to
nearby neighbours on foot without success. Audrey expressed, “The wind was so
severe we couldn’t even get across there, so we had to get in the car and go
by my mother at 5am in the morning - all of us and the baby!”

A waterfront home in James' Cistern lost portions of its' roof.

The eye of the Hurricane appeared to pass close to Palmetto Point, Governor's
Harbour and James' Cistern at around 6am when a calm came across the area. What
may have been Hurricane Hunter aircraft could be heard, over Governor's at
around the same time as the brief calm. What preceded the eye was an hour of the
most intense winds of the night, that according to several people, had many in
fear of losing their roofs.

What followed the calm was an onslaught of onshore
sustained winds that ripped many shingles from the south-western side of homes
on that coast in the center of the island.

The Governor's Harbour Police Station under water during the flooding in
Governor's Harbour.

In Governor’s Harbour the Bayfront flooded near midday on Thursday, sweeping
into basements, causing major erosion in some areas and depositing mountains of
sea debris in others. In the true spirit of 'do it yourself' that fuels
Eleuthera, crews were out to clean-up as soon as the skies cleared and the water
receded with the tide.
In the vicinity of the Administration building, poles and wires littered the
street. Visible shingle damage was obvious on the Administrator’s residence of
Cupid’s Cay. There on the vulnerable Cay, huge trailers and campers were
overturned, the Customs warehouse lost chucks of its roof and homes suffered
both flooding and roof damage.
For settlements such as Bogue, Gregory Town, Hatchet Bay, and Tarpum Bay, the
damage appeared less severe than others, but many homes too suffered varying
levels of roof damage.

As residents explained, the roof damage might appear minor on the outside but it
resulted in water getting in and destroying areas of ceiling as well as home
contents. No settlement visited were without homes with missing shingles and in
some areas the damage was much worse than others.

Cigatoo Quality Inn lost a sizeable portion of its' roof.
Sunset Inn Restaurant has major damage to its' roof following the passage of
Irene.

Businesses like Cigatoo Quality Inn, Sunset Inn and the Globe Princess movie
theatre in Governor's Harbour had significant roof damage, with portions ripped
away, while others like Burrows and Highway Service Station fared better. The
metal canopy over the gas station at Eleuthera Supply was mangled by the storm,
however, the grocery and gas station were open for business as of Friday,
becoming an important source of supplies, fuel and ice. Pineapple Fields
Resort according to its manager, was not damaged in the storm. The Restaurant
Tippy's was open for dinner on Sunday at 6pm and expects to return to normal
hours on Tuesday. Like other buildings in the area, it did not suffer much
visible damage.

The Emma Cooper (Palmetto Point) Primary School, James Cistern Library and
Primary School, Gregory Town Primary School and the closed St. Anns School in
Rock Sound lost parts of their roofs in the storm. Governor’s Harbour
Primary School served as a Hurricane Shelter for 18 persons who spent much of
their time drying up the water coming through the damaged roof. Water also
leaked into the James' Cistern hurricane shelter, which housed about 40 persons
during the storm.
Major roof damage at Emma Cooper Primary in Palmetto Point.

Gregory Town Primary also had part of its' roof torn apart.
In Rainbow Bay, a resident described incredibly high waves crashing against her
brother's cliffside home. While his structure held fast, a compromised meter
box allowed water to pour into the home through conduits, resulting in water
having to be bailed out throughout the storm. Undoubtedly the damage overall
could have been worse and residents have expressed relief in their homes
withstanding the winds without wall failures, however, some have complained
that they believe the extent of the damage individual home owners have suffered,
is being downplayed.

Many of the resident homes, vacation homes and businesses seen across The
Eleutheras appeared to have weathered the storm well. Overall on Spanish
Wells, Harbour Island and the mainland many businesses did not suffer damage
that would impede them hosting customers except that for many on the mainland,
electricity, water, and telecommunication may still be an issue.

With the exception of James' Cistern, all main roads we travelled on Saturday
were clear of debris and on Sunday we noticed the turbid waters were clearing
up, back to their beautiful blue. BEC continues to work very hard at restoring
electricity and many customers in Governor's Harbour and Palmetto Point saw
their lights come back on Sunday. BTC personnel has also been seen throughout
the settlements, even through the weekend working on restoring service to
customers as well. There is still much to be done, especially north of
Governor's Harbour.
Posted by:Aug 28th 2011, 12:35:34 am
NebraskaFriendsBriland friends in Nebraska are keeping close track of all you. Rachel and Maria, please let us know if there is anything we can do to help. We send prayers. --Barnie, Patty & Shelley
Posted by:Aug 27th 2011, 07:44:41 pm
Fig Tree News TeamFORBES | 8/25/2011
From The Bahamas: Better Hurricane Advice

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffmcmahon/2011/08/25/from-the-bahamas-better-hurricane-advice/

NASSAU, BAHAMAS–Hurricane Irene is swirling around me right now, slamming gates, lashing shutters with wind and rain, bending coconut palms, and sweeping from these low, sandy islands anything that’s not been tied down.

In the hours leading to this moment, two distinct kinds of humans could be observed here: panicked Americans and calm Bahamians.

American tourists crowded hotel reception desks and taxi stands yesterday, rushing to escape to the more beseiged airport, while Bahamians took in stride the necessity of additional work: screwing plywood over windows, stacking deck chairs and tossing them into hotel pools to keep them from becoming airbone in the coming winds.

Why such a difference in attitude between Bahamians and Americans? Here’s what one native Bahamian told me:

“I have lived through many hurricanes in the Bahamas. You just need a place to stay out of the rain and relax until it’s over.”

Meanwhile, the American cable news channels, CNN and The Weather Channel, have been hawking danger and devastation for these islands and for 55 million people on the American East Coast. “You need to have a survival kit!” one televised expert insisted. “After 9-11 people found themselves without goggles and gas masks.”

How will a gas mask help in this hurricane?

This morning, The Weather Channel advised its viewers to purchase pet survival kits, with a 5-day supply of water for pets.

Other tips offered recently by the cable news channels:

Read your homeowner’s insurance policy
Call your gas company and ask them what you should do
Turn off your electricity at the circuit breaker or fuse box
That last bit of advice will spare you, at least, from the fear mongering that draws viewers to these channels like gawkers to a car crash.

One Weather Channel anchor slipped yesterday and referred to a weakening of Irene as “a setback.”

Another anchor said, “If you have family, friends in (the Bahamas), you have to let them know this is a very dangerous situation!”

As if we don’t know what’s happening around us in the Bahamas. And as if a telephonic influx of American fear could possibly be useful. America has become the land of the free and the home of the afraid.

“Take a deep breath,” my Bahamian friend advises. “Relax. And stay out of the wind and the rain.” So simple.

The Bahamian government has advised its citizens to make sure they have food and water, to cover their windows, and to stay indoors until the storm passes.

So simple.

But for Americans accustomed to a certain balance of fear and comfort, let me add a suggestion to these bits of advice: If a hurricane is headed your way, check into a hotel.

I booked a room at the least expensive hotel I could find, the Comfort Suites on Paradise Island. They’re supplying guests with free food and water–though we still have clean tap water and electricity. They lent me the laptop upon which I’m typing this post.

When you stay in a hotel, your safety becomes the hotel’s responsibility. So check in. Turn off the television. Read a good book.
Posted by:Aug 27th 2011, 04:00:16 pm
Fig Tree News TeamArthur's Bakery Blog
Irene has come and Gone
2011-08-26 23:41:01

Im happy to report that Harbour Island made it through the storm, with no major injuries and very little structural damage.
There are lots of trees down. Big old trees in the library yard,the Parish hall yard, and other places on the Island have lots major limbs or have fallen down.
There is beach erosion , but I've not seen any homes threatened.
Most of the steps to the beach are gone.
50% percent of the coconut trees I've seen have snapped at the tops , or broken at the base.
The Power is off on the island , but slowly being restored . Some parts will take longer due to trees snapping the power lines.
Water is off over most of the Island , but some areas are getting a little, and more areas are getting served
So for most of the docks I've seen along Bay St are in good shape. The loyalist cottage dock has broken away. Valentines lost lots of planks. Romora Did fine.
Most of the The Roof shingles on the Library blew off , so there is some book and computer damage. The computers were covered, but we'll have to check them out to see if there was any damage. Many of the Books are damp. Most are able to be saved. There are tarps on the roof , but its still rainy.
As soon as I can , I'll be posting photos , and giving you more details.
To our friends in N Carolina, New York , and the rest of the Northeast, be careful. Our Thoughts are with you.
Now, Back to clearing more trees from the streets...
Posted by:Aug 27th 2011, 03:57:44 pm
Fig Tree News TeamNews from Robert Arthur at MyHarbourIsland.com:

http://myharbourisland.com/blog.php?id=27
Posted by:Aug 27th 2011, 01:21:05 pm
Fig Tree News TeamMore specific damage reports are coming in at this hour: sadly, the Sir George S. Roberts Memorial Library lost its entire roof, and the Commissioners Residence sustained significant damage to its roof. There's significant beach erosion, and many substantial trees around the island were felled by the storm's force.

More updates as we get word ... and stay tuned for details of the inevitable Briland Modem Fund Tree Drive to replace much of the public shrubbery and trees. Remember, the kindest gifts you can exchange on the island for the next few years will be the planting of green ... pass it on!
Posted by:Aug 27th 2011, 12:56:08 pm
Fig Tree News TeamExceptional insight from resident India Hicks, who quite literally offers a bird's eye view of the storm:

Our Visit From Irene
Aug 26, 2011

As the hurricane tore across the tiny Bahamian Island India Hicks calls home—ripping palm trees from their roots, leveling beach cabanas, and knocking hummingbirds to the ground—she's reminded that a force much greater than us is in control.

More
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/08/26/hurricane-irene-hits-the-bahamas-and-india-hicks-supplies-a-firsthand-account.html?fb_ref=article%3Barticle&fb_source=home_oneline

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